The Brutalist Playground, by Assemble and Simon Terrill

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The RIBA – Royal Institute of British Architects – has revealed an installation, which can be interacted and “played” with by the public.

The Brutalist Playground is an “immersive landscape”, says the RIBA, created by design and architecture collective Assemble and artist Simon Terrill.

It is inspired by post-war concrete playgrounds based in London housing estates in the mid 20th century, such as Churchill Gardens in Pimlico, and the Brunel Estate in Paddington.

The designers have recreated elements of these concrete playgrounds using reconstituted foam to create an “interactive, contemporary space where the viewer becomes participant”, says the RIBA. Archive images of the original playgrounds will also be projected on the walls.

A spokesperson at Assemble says: “Working with the RIBA collections and Simon Terrill, the interpretation of these spaces has allowed us to ask questions around materiality and the nature of risk in play, while also giving greater visibility to the incredible original images of the playgrounds that can be found in the collections.”

The Brutalist Playground is part of the London Festival of Architecture, and is based at the Architecture Gallery at the RIBA.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 08:  The Brutalist Playground is the latest work by Turner Prize nominees Assemble with artist Simon Terrill at the RIBA on June 8, 2015 in London, England.  The installation is open free to the public from 10 June to 16 August at the Architecture Gallery, RIBA, London.  (Photo by Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for The Royal Institue Of British Architects (RIBA))558442569TF013_London_Art_C558442569TF015_London_Art_C558442569TF011_London_Art_C[1]All images © Tristan Fewings and Getty Images for RIBA.

Churchill Gardens Estate. © John Donat - RIBA Library Photographs Collection.
Churchill Gardens Estate. © John Donat – RIBA Library Photographs Collection.
Churchill Gardens, 1956. ©: John Maltby - RIBA Library Photographs Collection.
Churchill Gardens, 1956. ©: John Maltby – RIBA Library Photographs Collection.