London next in line for Taschen store

Taschen is planning to open stores in the UK upon completion of its Philippe Starck-designed store in New York City.

The German publisher is considering opening two shops by 2007, possibly located in London’s West End and Kensington, and is currently on the hunt to find suitable sites, according to a spokeswoman for Taschen.

A designer has not yet been appointed to the project, but it is likely that Starck, who has also created the interiors for Taschen flagship stores based in Paris and Beverly Hills, will be drafted in to design the interiors.

‘There is not a Taschen shop based in London and we are next on the list,’ says the spokeswoman.

Starck is currently designing Taschen’s latest US store, scheduled to open in New York City next spring.

Located in SoHo, on 107 Greene Street, the store will feature work from a ‘major’ contemporary artist and it will probably reflect the extravagant and quirky designs of other Taschen bookstores.

The Beverly Hills store, for example, which launched almost three years ago, is loosely based around the design concept of a ‘Sistine Chapel’, according to owner Benedikt Taschen. It features a lounge area with a black leather banquette, plasma TV screens, a communal reading area, purple mirrors and handmade glass walls.

Artist Albert Oehlen has created 20 computer-generated collages, inspired by the wide selection of Taschen books adorning the walls and ceiling.

The design of the Paris-based store – launched in 2001- is more akin to a boutique retail space.

Benedikt Taschen opened his first bookshop – which specialised in comics – 25 years ago. The publisher now specialises in books on design, fashion, travel and pop culture.

Taschen stores Designed by Philippe Starck

2001 – Paris, France

2003 – Beverly Hills, Los Angeles

2005 – SoHo, New York City

2007 – London?

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