Computer upgrades are a necessity not a luxury

I can well understand Alan Clarke’s hesitancy to upgrade his Apple Macintosh software and hardware (DW Letters 20 May). He has a point – the manufacturers are in it for the profit, but you also get what you pay for with greatly enhanced productivity.

I can well understand Alan Clarke’s hesitancy to upgrade his Apple Macintosh software and hardware (DW Letters 20 May). He has a point – the manufacturers are in it for the profit, but you also get what you pay for with greatly enhanced productivity.

Really you can’t compare Photoshop Version 3 with Photoshop CS – it’s a different world. Just flicking through folders of images on the File Browser alone will suggest that we’re playing a different ball game here.

I’m not going to go on about the countless features that have been implemented over the past few years. But it’s impossible to leave the subject of Mac OSX without mentioning the interaction of Adobe’s Creative Suite. I suggest Clarke compares InDesign CS with his version of QuarkXPress 6.1.

Maybe your budget constrains you from implementing every single upgrade – and, yes, it’s hard to keep track of them. But there will come a time when you realise that unless you bite the bullet and do it you’ll be a mere fossilised arm of an industry that’s left you behind.

Andrew Mann

Designer

BMS World Mission

Didcot OX11 8XA

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