Interiors and identity to broaden Jaeger’s appeal

British clothing brand Jaeger is poised to “do a Burberry” and attempt to turn around its fortunes, following the appointment of David Collins Architecture and Design and Lewis Moberly.

The consultancies have been selected to revamp Jaeger’s store interiors and create an identity to “broaden [the brand’s] appeal”.

Both the store interiors and the new look identity will make their debuts in August.

David Collins Architecture and Design won the seven-figure interiors project last September without a pitch.

Lewis Moberly was appointed at the same time, following a credentials pitch.

The retailer’s decision to attempt to reinvigorate its brand follows the appointment last year of Patricia Burnett as chief executive. “We are putting the luxury back into Jaeger [by] rediscovering the glamour and elegance within the brand,” Burnett says.

The interiors are being introduced to a site in Leeds in August, and will then be rolled out. They are designed to reflect a more contemporary image.

“The modernity with which Jaeger has always been associated needs to be re-emphasised,” says David Collins. “The interiors will be sensual and textural, featuring bespoke lighting and furniture.”

The corporate identity will move away from the existing logo in italics, says Lewis Moberly creative director Mary Lewis.

“We are trying to re-position Jaeger as a modern classic,” says Lewis. The consultancy has worked closely with Jaeger fashion designers and David Collins to ensure all expressions of the brand “dovetail”.

The identity will roll out globally, following its launch in Leeds.

A further three existing UK stores are planned for refurbishment by the end of the year, based on the David Collins-designed Leeds blueprint. Jaeger declines to name the locations. This launch will be followed by a gradual roll-out of the concepts across Jaeger’s 56 UK standalone stores and 103 concessions.

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