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This week has seen the Victoria & Albert Museum acquire designer John Pasche’s Rolling Stones 1970 Tongue and Lips logo. If you could see any graphic work housed in a museum, what would it be, and why?

This week has seen the Victoria & Albert Museum acquire designer John Pasche’s Rolling Stones 1970 Tongue and Lips logo. If you could see any graphic work housed in a museum, what would it be, and why?

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Along with Andy Warhol’s zippered fly and Peter Blake’s Sgt Pepper’s crowd, John Pasche’s Rolling Stones mouth is one of the great graphic icons of modern music. If it’s great work, it stays fresh even if it’s decades old. I think Michael Peters’ Winsor & Newton inks are still utterly charming; Robert Brownjohn’s Bond movie intro sequences are electrifying; and, of course, the Penguin book covers of the 1960s and 1970s. I would also vote for Michael Wolff’s playful and vivacious identities for Bovis, Hatfield Paints and P&O.

Quentin Newark, Co-founder Atelier Works

Too much excellent graphic work is taken for granted by the general public. I feel that, above all, typefaces fall into this category. Showcasing them in our museums gives us a chance to celebrate their quality and artistry. In particular, I would like to see a Verdana exhibit. It was created by Matthew Carter for Microsoft in 1996 and is used by millions of people every day. Few of these stop to admire its functional elegance. Perhaps a museum’s focus could change this state of affairs

Philip Jansseune, Creative director, Walker Jansseune

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As this month is the tenth anniversary of Google, perhaps it would be appropriate to suggest the logo of this colossus of the Internet. Apart from being one of the strongest brands in the world, it is also one of the most recognised and well-received pieces of design. Personally, I think it is bloody awful, but it serves as a constant reminder to me that I am not always right, and that successful design is about the response from the viewer.

Ian Hambleton, Partner/account director, Studio Output

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