License fee revenue channelled to BBC’s creatives

We were pleased once again to have made it into the Top 50 creative groups (DW 28 November). I would, however, like to take issue with the editorial comment that ranks BBC Creative Services top of the screen graphics category.

We were pleased once again to have made it into the Top 50 creative groups (DW 28 November).

I would, however, like to take issue with the editorial comment that ranks BBC Creative Services top of the screen graphics category.

There is no doubt that there is a high standard of creative excellence on show at the BBC, but much of it is not a product of BBC Creative Services.

For example, the much-lauded promotion Rush Hour, featuring stuntman David Belle leaping over rooftops, was commissioned by BBC Marketing and produced by Abbot Mead Vickers BBDO.

Similarly all the on-screen idents for all BBC channels are produced by Lambie-Nairn, which seems to have a monopoly at the BBC (but that’s another story).

There is currently general concern throughout the television industry that the BBC is distorting the entire television landscape. This is because it is funded by the television licence that we all have to pay by law if we want to watch any television channel.

Last year the BBC’s income was £3.2bn. Other television companies have to survive mainly through advertising, which in economic downturn has bitten hard forcing cutbacks and, of course, cost-cutting exercises that have hit consultancies like Kemistry hard.

On top of this, consultancies have to compete for commercial work against BBC Creative Services with its huge resources and power of the BBC brand behind it.

Graham McCallum

Creative director

Kemistry

London W6

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