Draught Poetry Society

Draught Associates has been commissioned to undertake an identity overhaul of The Poetry Society on a pro bono contract worth £7000 following a five-way creative pitch.

The charity hopes to mark its centenary in January 2009 by uniting all of its publications, its website and café in Covent Garden, London WC2, under one brand.

Jules Mann, director of The Poetry Society, was advised by long-term Design Week contributor David Bernstein, who acted as a consultant to the charity during the pitching process two weeks ago.

Mann says, ‘People don’t know who we are. We’re looking for a way to convey our identity with a much more user-friendly and visual brand logo to show we’re accessible.’

Taking this brief, Draught Associates is currently developing two routes of enquiry for the society. When complete, the new identity will first be implemented in The Poetry Review magazine (first published in 1912), to be followed by a ‘re-skinning’ of the society’s website – which was designed by Assanka in 2006 – and updated signage at its Poetry Place café (pictured).

Mann says ‘We’ve never been able to flag up the café before, and it’s the most tangible thing that we do.’

The project will look to redefine and clarify the charity’s offer. Michael Lenz, director of Draught Associates, says, ‘It will affect everything form the society’s corporate image right down to communication with schools.’

He adds, ‘Ultimately, we’re dealing with a broad heritage and trying to inspire young poets. [The Poetry Society] wants to explore its community more without seeming too austere or alienating anyone.’



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