Catwalk graphics

The word branding comes within a hair’s breadth of its original meaning when a graphic designer brands a fashion label. It is merely that the savour of singed flesh is replaced by the stitching of a label that identifies a coat as belonging to Yves St Laurent, Chanel or Vivienne Westwood.

Graphic Design for Fashion, designed and written by By Both founders Simone Pasztorek and Jay Hess, reveals what can happen when a designer works for another designer.

’There are no written briefs, it’s usually just a picture or a scribbled note – I know intuitively what he wants and I can just get on with it. I think this is what makes him happy,’ says Aboud Creative founder Alan Aboud of his long-term client Paul Smith.

Their working relationship began in 1989, when Smith approached Aboud just after his degree show. ’There was a tiny bit of mistrust and a tiny bit of resistance to ideas’ at first, says Aboud, and the constant quest for new ideas still occasionally threatens the relationship.

The fierce pace of the fashion industry and its cyclical seasons provides designers with constant work, the pinnacle of which is the fashion show invitation.

Relatively low quantities are produced, allowing – even demanding – graphic designers to explore specialist techniques to create ever more ambitious interpretations of the fashion houses’ collections.

’Each new invitation has to be better than the previous one,’ insists Christian Lacroix’s graphic design group Antoine & Manuel.

Graphic Design For Fashion by Jay Hess and Simone Pasztorek is published in hardback by Laurence King Publishing in October, priced £26

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