Structural packaging is an untapped market

Thank you for the reminder that so much of a brand’s equity resides in its physical pack (DW 12 August).

Thank you for the reminder that so much of a brand’s equity resides in its physical pack (DW 12 August).

The examples shown of Waitrose’s redesigned London Dry Gin and Smirnoff Ice demonstrate at a glance exactly what product type you are dealing with. In the drinks sector, the square green bottle so readily denotes gin, while the slightly waisted clear glass bottle just has to contain vodka – or, in this case, a vodka mix.

A few years back, structural design was a big issue in the industry, as branding consultancies sought to introduce 3D design into their repertoire.

Previously, the technical side of packaging had been handled by clients’ in-house teams, especially on the own-brand side, where the diversity and volume of packaging involved led to more cost-effective buying if handled this way. Now we’re told that product design groups such as Kinneir Dufort and Factory tackle structural packaging briefs as a matter of course. But I’ll bet a lot of projects are still dealt with by in-house teams.

Can someone let me know if I’m correct in this assumption? If so, structural packaging is still an area for development in design; largely untapped as a market by all but the more specialised consultancies.

Freddie Greenslade

Freelance product designer

London SW11

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