D&AD should take a brief lesson in giving us value for money

I recently took part in D&AD’s New Blood event. All the universities attending pushed the importance of D&AD. I bought into the promise a Yellow Pencil might bestow, and parted with my money.

I recently took part in D&AD’s New Blood event. All the universities attending pushed the importance of D&AD. I bought into the promise a Yellow Pencil might bestow, and parted with my money.

Then I saw that most of this year’s entrants seemed to have ignored the brief and just done their own thing.

One entrant was surprised that the Warburtons brief was aimed at women and hadn’t even read it. Also, why were the Warburtons entries then judged by an all-male panel?

Why have a brief if it isn’t in the marking criteria? Why take my money year after year, ask for submissions responding to briefs, when the judges don’t know to look for this?

I think the D&AD is simply marketing itself and the power of the Yellow Pencil.

I will be buying myself red pencils from now on.

Kelly Burnett, Graduate, by e-mail

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  • Kelly Burnett November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    Hi – When I wrote my e-mail, my point was that it was the JUDGE who had not read the brief and therefore was not aware of the criteria set out when judging the work, not the entrant.

    Thank you for publishing my comment.

    Best Regards

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