Light & Coley cleans up with office services logo

Light & Coley has created a new name and identity for the former Personnel Hygiene Services, following its repositioning in the burgeoning workplace services sector.

Light & Coley has created a new name and identity for the former Personnel Hygiene Services, following its repositioning in the burgeoning workplace services sector. It has also changed the names and logotype for the group’s three divisions. The client has a 20 per cent share of the workplace services market, putting it second after Rentokil.

The project also involved strategic work. This included analysing the client’s business structure and its internal and external communications strategy, in view of its recent repositioning programme.

Now known as PHS Group, the client is in an ongoing programme of diversification, moving it from a washroom services company to supplier of a much broader range of workplace services. This includes adding the servicing of internal office environments and reception areas to its portfolio.

The identity had to reflect the new company, without losing sight of its original focus.

“The redesign of the icon has provided PHS with a much stronger, more professional platform. In implementation we have developed a dynamic and flexible visual language which brings a fresh look and unity to the group,” says Light & Coley design director Martin Seymour.

The identity will roll out to the clients’ 50 offices in the UK and the US, as well as signage, livery, uniforms, stationery and literature. The process should take between two and three months.

Light & Coley has also tweaked the names of the group’s three divisions to make them more user-friendly. The label PHS Workroom Services replaces PHS Hygiene Division, PHS Tropical Plant replaces PHS Tropical Plantscape and PHS Dust Mat replaces PHS Mat Services. Each division will be identified by the new PHS Group logo in conjunction with the division’s name.

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