The final word on those British Airways ethnic tailfins?

Sir Terence says, Michael says, Marcello saysä it looks like everyone has had the last word on the British Airways identity so I hesitate to say anything at all. Except the job’s not done and two wrongs don’t make a right.

Sir Terence says, Michael says, Marcello says it looks like everyone has had the last word on the British Airways identity so I hesitate to say anything at all. Except the job’s not done and two wrongs don’t make a right.

It’s good to be bold. It’s good to respect the diversity of peoples/ tribes. But that’s no reason to paint the tails of planes with illustrations of art. It’s ethnic, but it’s not art. The real reason it hasn’t stuck is because it’s not authentic and it’s in the wrong place. And the soft swooshes on the noses betray a wee bit of self doubt.

The new tails are something to do with Trafalgar? I don’t think so. More something to do with getting off the hook.

The point of writing isn’t to take sides. It is to say that the job to reposition the national carrier as a good global citizen, newly relevant to the needs of the world’s demanding fliers, remains to be done, is laudable, and really needs doing. Just be bold and be right at the same time.

BA was more than halfway there with the clarity of “to fly to serve”. Completed by “To fly to serve the world”.

Now that would become the world’s favourite airline! An airline that treats everyone well irrespective of creed, nationality, class of travel or price of seat.

Doug Hamilton

Executive creative director

Wolff Olins

London N1

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