Challenging design’s limits beats revering ‘heroes’

I was disappointed to read about the actions of James Dyson (DW 30 September) and the comments made by Terence Conran (DW 7 October) regarding the direction and policy of the Design Museum.

I was disappointed to read about the actions of James Dyson (DW 30 September) and the comments made by Terence Conran (DW 7 October) regarding the direction and policy of the Design Museum.

My own experience is of how vibrant the museum has become recently. The exhibitions are stimulating and capture the width and breadth of current design activity.

Design today is more about diversity and inclusivity than before and it’s a shame that some of the comments made smack of the ‘this is good design because we tell you so’ approach that has characterised our national view of design and education for decades. It is stimulating to see work by people who challenge the limits of design, which is healthier than reverence to the same old ‘heroes’.

If some of the museum’s programmes aren’t to everyone’s taste isn’t this a positive point? If we can’t be challenged, how can we hope to remain as a leading cre

ative nation? If the current exhibition on the Jaguar E-type doesn’t ‘herald the manufactured object and the industrial design process’ (Dyson, The Guardian, 28 September) I’m not sure what does. Dyson might also reflect that this product was manufactured in Britain.

The Design Museum is more popular and vibrant than ever, we should celebrate this fact and congratulate the team that has achieved this and inspire it to move forward from strength to strength.

Stephen Anderson

Director

BDP Design

London EC1V

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