Apple to roll out “gathering space” concept in global store redesign

The initiative will see almost 500 Apple stores around the world host free events, workshops and training sessions for the public on subjects such as design and coding.

Apple is launching a new global store concept that will see every Apple store become a “modern-day town square” and events space for the general public.

The tech giant’s Today at Apple program is set to roll out internationally in all of its 495 stores, and will see each of them host free workshops on topics including photography, design and coding.

The initiative is a wider roll out of the Apple store opened in San Francisco, US in May 2016, which is designed to be a work and gathering space for the public as well as a regular retail store.

The San Francisco store is open to the public 24 hours a day, and includes a canopy of trees and an area that hosts all of the Today at Apple events, with a large “video wall” that is used in the more interactive sessions.

Workshops and educational sessions

Mobile screens created by Apple’s in-house design team specifically for the Today at Apple program will now feature in all of its stores, along with new wall displays to showcase its products and updated seating and sound.

Regular sessions will include photography workshops for both iPhone users interested in photography and more advanced photographers; presentations on art and design; advice-based workshops for teachers on how to incorporate technology into the classroom; and sessions on music-making and coding with robots for families.

Senior vice president of retail at Apple, Angela Ahrendts, says: “At the heart of every Apple store is the desire to educate and inspire the communities we serve.”

“We’re creating a modern-day town square, where everyone is welcome in a space where the best of Apple comes together to connect with one another, discover a new passion, or take their skill to the next level.”

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