Staging disorder at LCC

An exhibition of constructed conflict photography has opened at the London College of Communication. 

Sarah Pickering, Public Order
Sarah Pickering, Public Order

Staging Disorder includes seven photographic series, all created independently within the 2000s, which include mock scenarios designed to act as simulations in preparation for future conflict.

Studio Hato completed the exhibition and accompanying booklet design, while Christopher Stewart and Esther Teichmann curated the show. Karin Askham, the dean of the School of Media at the London College of Communication, initiated the project.

Richard Mosse, Airside
Richard Mosse, Airside

“The exhibition brings together art works that explore sites used for preparation for conflict,” says Stewart. The photographic works visualise anticipatory spaces used for training before military and civilian deployment in war zones, and potential sites of civilian unrest.”

“Props” photographed include constructed houses, streets, towns, war vehicles and aircrafts, staged by the artists to look like real documentary images.

Richard Mosse, Airside
Richard Mosse, Airside

The idea of a constructed reality has been reflected in the exhibition design, which includes unfinished paint edges surrounding the photographs, a paper-and-tape-effect design used to present the artists’ credits and a constructed font.

Staging Disorder
Staging Disorder
Claudio Hils, Red Land, Blue Land
Claudio Hils, Red Land, Blue Land

“The main theme of the exhibition is of staged space, and so we translated this into the actual gallery,” says Margherita Huntley, designer at Studio Hato.

“We’ve highlighted rather than hidden parts of the exhibition installation. We’ve also used the online tool Metaflop to create typefaces for the show. It allows you to control and test the design of a typeface from a set number of variables and parameters – a process that connects with the themes of staged exercises and testing grounds in the exhibition.”

Christopher Stewart, Kill House
Christopher Stewart, Kill House

She also says that the exhibition design has been kept relatively simple so as not to distract from the work on show. “A lot of the photographic work is really monumental, so we didn’t want anything to overpower it,” Huntley says.

Claudio Hils, Red Land Blue Land
Claudio Hils, Red Land Blue Land

A Staging Disorder book has been produced alongside the exhibition, which showcases its photography. It has been produced by Black Dog Publishing, and is co-edited by the exhibition curators.

An My Le, 29 Palms
An My Le, 29 Palms

Staging Disorder runs until 12 March at the London College of Communication, University of the Arts London, Elephant & Castle, London, SE1 6SB. Entry to the show is free. 

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