Creating a “jargon” free identity for a mortgage start-up

London-based consultancy Ragged Edge has redesigned the identity for mortgage broker Trussle, featuring a simple, graphic logo that symbolises an “open door”.

Ragged Edge has rebranded mortgage start-up Trussle, creating a new identity and a colourful, illustrated campaign for the company.

The UK-based, online mortgage broker was founded in 2015, and aims to make securing a mortgage a less “painful” experience, says founder and CEO Ishaan Malhi.

Trussle was born out of Malhi’s own frustration when he struggled to secure a mortgage for his first home. “There‘s too much jargon, too much complexity and not enough transparency,” he says.

Ragged Edge was commissioned to create a new visual and verbal identity for Trussle, which aims to “stand for far more than finance”, says the consultancy.

The identity is based around a simple, bright pink graphic symbol that represents an open door, and is accompanied by the tagline “The home of home ownership”.

Ragged Edge also worked with UnLtd and Squadron Venture Media to create an accompanying campaign that looks to tackle “mortgage inertia”, says the consultancy.

The poster campaign features brightly coloured illustrations depicting various scenarios, such as people getting on the property ladder.

The identity is currently rolling out across all touchpoints.

Hide Comments (1)Show Comments (1)
Comments
  • Michael Burton April 3, 2018 at 4:09 pm

    Fantastic and simplistic – really answers the brief well! Love the simplistic idea behind the logo being the sweeping motion of a door opening – along with that graphic carrying itself over into the branding visuals to tie it all together. Also the bright, fun, pastel colour scheme will work wonders at attracting first time buyers (i.e. young adults).

  • Post a comment

Latest articles

Design Week Awards 2019 judges revealed…

Experts on branding (Jack Renwick), social design (Sophie Thomas), exhibition design (Lucienne Roberts) are joined by Ustwo design director Helen Fuchs, The Guardian’s digital director Ben Longden and many more.