Design graduates in TV don’t have to be patient

I was interested to read that Lisa Linder (Profile, DW 21 July) left the TV design industry when she realised that ‘it takes ten years before they let you design your first title sequence’.

I was interested to read that Lisa Linder (Profile, DW 21 July) left the TV design industry when she realised that ‘it takes ten years before they let you design your first title sequence’.

As a graduate designer, this has not been my experience. I have been with BBC Broadcast for ten months and worked on a title sequence and idents for the BBC, as well as on-screen identities for Belgian public service channels Eén and Canvas, and the Discovery Channel in the US.

My team values people who get involved. I was fresh out of university when I started in September, but I have always been fully engaged in projects. One of the main reasons work experience students and graduates are recruited here is so that fresh ideas keep coming in.

I’ve found that being a TV designer isn’t just about the concept and design. I have had to learn how to work with inferno editors to produce my designs, and to understand the business case for my work. I’m on a big learning curve, but I’m being helped along by my team.

So I have no need to run off and become a photographer at the moment, though travelling around the world taking pictures does sound fun.

Amy Doherty, Designer, BBC Broadcast, London W12

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