Taggers commit criminal damage, so it’s not art

I read with mounting venom your Diary piece, Anonymous East End taggers captured on camera. (DW 17 October) I was appalled that Volkswagen UK decided to use graffiti in the Hoxton area to promote its cars, and I was instrumental in having them stop their

I read with mounting venom your Diary piece, Anonymous East End taggers captured on camera. (DW 17 October)

I was appalled that Volkswagen UK decided to use graffiti in the Hoxton area to promote its cars, and I was instrumental in having them stop their illegal campaign. I am offended by tagging that makes a rough area look even rougher, and if it is labelled art then it is still illegal and a serious arrestable offence.

It is not justifiable to maliciously damage a piece of private or public property under any circumstances. Holding an art exhibition depicting this damage is fair enough, but I really do object to the idea that it is somehow creative and good to go around tagging.

How can it be anything other than offensive. The dog used in your promotional diary piece is on a wall that I walk past everyday, it has become boring and just makes the road look rubbish (pictured). It encourages more damage and more crime and more upset for people who just want to live or work in this area in peace.

I am a graduate of art history and I love art. I am also grown up enough to see tagging for what it is and want it to stop.

Nick Lerner

Managing director

The Crocodile PR

Hoxton

London N1

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