Worthington sups new identity for Creamflow

Holmes & Marchant International is revitalising the Worthington Creamflow Bitter identity with a view to expanding the brand in the New Year.

Holmes & Marchant International is revitalising the Worthington Creamflow Bitter identity with a view to expanding the brand in the New Year.

Worthington, which is part of Interbrew-owned Bass Brewers, is brewed in Burton-upon-Trent, Staffordshire. Holmes & March-ant International, which is on the Bass Brewers roster, was given the contract following work on updating the Worthington Creamflow Bitter cans and multipacks last year.

The fee for the work will be between £75 000 and £100 000, depending on how far the brand is extended, something that has yet to be decided, according to Holmes & Marchant International account director Ian Kelly.

According to Kelly, Bass Brewers is putting more money into the brand to develop market share. Worthington Creamflow Bitter occupies the third position in the UK’s standard ale sector.

“Worthington is seen as reliable and refreshing and is a good, solid drink,” Kelly says. “It has a great heritage and has been around for more than 200 years.

“We are trying to bring back the pride, character and integrity in a more robust way,” Kelly continues. “We feel this may be too recessive on some packaging. It will look different, that’s for sure.”

Kelly says Worthington’s target market is 35to 55-year-olds, which might be reduced to the 25to 44-year age bracket.

The bitter, which has 3.6 per cent alcohol by volume, is popular in its Midlands heartland.

Belgium-based Interbrew is the second largest brewer in the world in terms of volume. Its brands include Stella Artois, Hoegaarden, Leffe and Labbatt Blue. The brewer, which has brewing operations in 19 countries, bought Bass Brewers from Bass in June 2000 in a £2.3bn deal. Key Bass Brewers brands include Carling, Tennent’s and Caffrey’s.

Latest articles

What to do and see at Designjunction 2018

From 20-23 September, London’s Designjunction takes place on the South of the River Thames, and will see installations, exhibitions, talks and its well-known fair spread across three venues including Doon