Tattersall Hammarling & Silk identifies FT-SE International

The Financial Times and London Stock Exchange last week launched FT-SE International, a joint company to manage and develop FT and Stock Exchange indices. The identity is by Tattersall Hammarling & Silk.

The group won the project after a proposals pitch. Group partner Rob Silk says: “The colours – dark blue and orange – are derived from the FT and Stock Exchange corporate identities.

“We wanted to give the logo more energy and make it immediate and different, in contrast to the more established Stock Exchange and FT identities.”

TH&S hopes to work on the new company’s brochure, indices reports and newsletter. FT-SE International is expected to be in operation before the end of November.

The consultancy has also launched the identity for the UK’s newest trades union, the Public Services, Tax and Commerce Union.

The PTC, formed through the merger of the National Union of Civil and Public Servants and the Inland Revenue Staff Federation, currently has 160 000 members, making it the largest Civil Service union in Europe.

Tattersall Hammarling & Silk is responsible for designing much of the union’s printed material, including the annual report, signage and cheques.

The logo is in dark green and mustard to indicate that the union is “looking after its members rather than looking for a fight”, says Silk.

The graphic device below the lettering is designed to make the identity more memorable when so many other unions are also known by their initials. “The idea is a little smile,” Silk explains.

The choice of colours and design was influenced by the fact that 50 per cent of the PTC’s members are women. The PTC’s new look will come into effect from 1 January 1996.

TH&S has worked on identities for UNISON and the GMB unions and is currently reviewing the Labour Party’s visual identity.

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