Voxpop

Following news that Coca-Cola is holding a pitch for its first pan-European design roster, is it beneficial for consultancies to partake in the lengthy pitch process for a place on a big brand’s roster when work is never guaranteed?

Big brands are like planets – they possess a high gravitational pull that holds a plethora of businesses in their orbit. And none more so than Coca-Cola, the mother of all worlds, which resembles some crazy vision of the future, a globe coated with metallic, urban structures, ringed with interplanetary debris from years of colliding crafts, bustling to meet their demanding grinding schedules, all set to a seemingly optimistic song ground out by the big happy organ deep in its bowels. In a word, no.
Nicolas Roope, Creative director, Poke London

Julie Oxberry, Managing director, Household

With an increasingly competitive playing field of design consultancies diversifying their offers and crossing into non-traditional disciplines, it can be a bit of a bun fight. The opportunity to engage directly with a potential client on what makes your offer different and where you bring added value to their business is a golden one. Work or no work – if it distances you from the crowd and positions you in a carefully edited group of preferred experts, you are one step closer to growing a great relationship. As The Streets say, ‘A grand don’t come for free’.
Julie Oxberry, Managing director, Household


Dom Bailey, Director, 300 Million

Of course it’s beneficial for consultancies to take part in high profile pitches – after all, they’re getting paid, right? It should be paid for as it’s giving the client valuable insight and commercial value. With this simple principle in place it’s down to those fortunate enough to be asked to deliver the goods, however long the process takes. Building a relationship that leads to project work beyond the pitch is another issue altogether.
Dom Bailey, Director, 300 Million

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