Design in 2017 – what will interiors look like?

As part of our series on the future of design in 2017, Airbnb lead interior designer Rebecca Ruggles looks at what will happen in interior design over the next 12 months.

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What do you think 2017 will hold for interior design?

The democratisation of design – it will become more accessible to everyone. I think online interior design services like Homepolish and Laurel & Wolf will grow even more in popularity for the residential and small business markets.

We’re shifting from the DIY movement to the recognition that professional advice makes a big difference, but not everyone has a budget for that. With these new services, people are trying to find a happy medium between the two. You can design one room at a time, or the whole space, at a budget that you dictate. It’s all up to you.

What was your favourite interior design project in 2016?

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A couple come to mind, firstly Aesop in Sao Paulo, Brazil. I have a love affair with Aesop store designs and seek them out in every city that I visit. I think Aesop does an amazing job of showcasing their brand in a simple, authentic way that doesn’t overwhelm you with logos and products.

Each store is unique and highlights local materials and design. I particularly loved the use of the local ventilation blocks as a feature in the new Sao Paulo location. It is a typical material in the neighbourhood, but the company use it in a new way that adds warmth and an eye catching graphic effect which draws customers in.

Secondly, Daroco is a new restaurant in Paris. It serves Italian food, but I love how it adds its own Parisian twist to the design and references the history of the building, similar to how we showcase Airbnb listings from around the world in our meeting rooms, but add some local flair to them as well.

It is based in Jean Paul Gaultier’s former store, so the staff uniforms are his signature striped sailor shirts. A subtle leaf motif is used in the flooring as well as on the menus and the logo.

The textures from the old building look amazing juxtaposed against plush velvet banquettes and green stone table tops. And the mirror on the ceiling turns dining into theatre and makes the space feel huge, which seems like such a luxury in Paris.

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