Milan furniture fair launches show experimental bent

An emphasis on new materials and technical experimentation has been evident at Milan furniture fair this week.



An emphasis on new materials and technical experimentation has been evident at Milan furniture fair this week.


The fair this year has so far produced a number of installations and designers making forays into new disciplines.


Jason Bruges has produced his first product, Flatliner, for Established & Sons. Jason Bruges has interpreted a classic lamp, rethinking its form and experiments with intelligent surfaces. A thin black acrylic disc is fitted with 240 LEDs, producing an interactive and dimmable light by touch. The product comes in both suspension and floor and table versions.


Bruges has also teamed up with product designer Jake Dyson to produce the installation Focal Shift.


The wall of light, 3m high by 7.5m wide, is made up of five panels and features 30 units of Dyson’s new remote-control motorised wall light, Motorlight Wall, which claims to be the only light to offer a variable-angle beam.


Terence Woodgate and John Barnard revisit the concept behind last year’s Surface table – spanning 3m with a thickness of just 2mm at the edge – with the introduction of Surface chair. The product exploits the rigidity of layered carbon fibre using autosport and aerospace technology.


US designer Karim Rashid launched his collection of furniture, Pinker, which aims to ‘blur the lines between home and office’. Singapore furniture company Office Planner founders Katrina Tan and Gavin Woo are also behind the range.


The Swarovski Crystal Palace was transformed by Arik Levy, with an installation, Osmosis, intended to get viewers thinking about the technology behind Swarovski crystals.


Glass craftsman and designer Danny Lane has made a venture into colour, while Tom Dixon, French collective 5.5 Designers and Swedish studio Front Design have created installations for Veuve Clicquot.

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