Interiors group sought for £32m Buxton Crescent luxury hotel

An interior design consultancy is being sought in a £32 million project to create a 79-bedroom, five-star spa hotel in Buxton, Derbyshire.


Source: Parksy1964

The Buxton Crescent Hotel is being developed in the 18th-century Grade I-listed Buxton Crescent building. The project is being run by landowners High Peak Borough Council and Derbyshire County Council.

The development, set to complete in 2015, will feature a five-star hotel, a state-of-the-art thermal spa, eight shops, a visitors’ centre and a refurbished pump-room housing a café.

The project managers are now seeking an interior design consultancy to work across the development, ‘ensuring there is a cohesive design theme running through the building’.

Other tasks will include ‘ensuring that the finishes are appropriate for the specialist uses in the building and that the services and other key interfaces are “lost” in the design.’

Consultancies interested in the contract – which is valued at £180 000-£300 000, must have experience working in Grade I-listed buildings as well as in luxury hotels and spas.

The deadline for receipt of tenders or requests to participate is 26 April. For more information and to apply, visit

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  • Marie cooper November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    I have an interior shop in Buxton town centre and would love to come along and view the building before and after the interior work is completed and if I could support the project or the interior designers who win the tende in any way I would be very honoured.
    Many thanks Marie at Everything’s Rosy Interiors hardwick street Buxton 01298 78778

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