A flexible identity for Speed Communications

Soapbox & Sons has rebranded PR group Speed Communications, creating an flexible identity formed from elements of the company’s initials.

Master logo
Master logo

The new look is based around an ‘S’, which is split to show both the ‘S’ and ‘C’ of the name, aiming to reference the idea of ‘connecting’ inherent to a PR company. This is used alongside a sans serif wordmark.

Jenny Theolin, Soapbox & Sons founder and creative director, says the project came about through a recommendation and an existing relationship with Speed managing director Kate Bosomworth.

Speed Communications identity
Speed Communications identity

Speed Communications was looking for a new identity following a merger with KTB PR in 2012, so it was thought a ‘fresh look at the brand would help unite the two agencies’, says Theolin.

She adds, ‘They wanted an identity that not only summed up their business, but one that was iconic and confident.

‘Their vision is to be recognised as the most proactive, creative and commercially driven PR agency to work with, so a solid no-nonsense approach was also required.’

Speed Communications identity
Speed Communications identity

As such, the logo is primarily set in mono, though a secondary, brighter  colour palette can also be used.

Stationery
Stationery

The identity is used across all touch points, including stationery and interior graphics.

Wall vinyl
Wall vinyl

The new Speed Communications website is being designed by Dan Bull of Observatory, and will launch in full later this year.

Speed Communications website
Speed Communications website
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Comments
  • C G November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    Hmmmm… ‘Split to show connection’ bit of an oxymoron.

    The knocked back ovals seem a bit pointless given they only relate to two of the four edges.

    Looks like one of those logos where an explanation is required with each deliverable.

    🙁

  • Neil parkes November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    I would have to agree, sadly I think this is one of those classic examples of design over content. It doesn’t seem finished some how.

  • Deborah Budd November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    I like the design, from the use of the Cs to form an S, to the subliminal S created in the negative space. As for connectedness, I see that in the knocked back circles feeding back into the white forms. I’d be interested to know the reasoning behind the use of the four foundation circles–perhaps representing 4 elements or internal values for the company? It’s always more clear how designers arrived at a logo if one has access to the original brief.

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