Cog redesigns Mayor’s Thames Festival identity

The Mayor’s Thames Festival in London will unveil a new identity next week, created by consultancy Cog Design.


Cog won a credentials pitch last year to redesign the festival’s website, and was awarded a contract in January to redesign the festival identity, now in its eleventh year.


Cog Design managing director Michael Smith says, ‘The festival has never worked with a design consultancy before – it has always worked on things in-house.’


‘From the bottom up, it’s a full visual identity, with complete guidelines. We’ve done six or seven formats, [including a] poster for South East Trains, leaflets and a 52-page brochure,’ says Smith.


The design will be rolled out across a wider campaign, including a range of advertisements, from next week.


The breadth of the festival posed a particular challenge, according to Smith. ‘It’s a multi-art form performance of street art and cabaret, involving high quality international and local acts across many venues, from Tower Bridge to Westminster,’ he says.


‘It was important to capture the human element and show that it’s a fun day out without making it look like a kids festival,’ he adds.


The Mayor’s Thames Festival will run from 13-14 September across Thames locations, between Westminster Bridge and Tower Bridge.

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  • Paul Harris November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but the identity is exactly the same as last years. Rather than being a bottom up redesign it seems to be nothing more than a tweak.

  • Magali Tonoli November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    This is a very nice piece of work but it’s almost exactly the same as last year’s Thames Festival print so how can it be a new identity? Should they not have moved on the design somehow instead of just repeating what’s gone on before?

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