Sweet smell of the warrior queen

While Jade Goody has been busy launching her Shh… perfume range, A-listers Gwyneth, Kate and Kelly will soon be able to create their own personal bespoke fragrances, with the launch of a top-end range by celebrity stylist Michael Boadi.


The hair stylist and art director has named, positioned and created the fragrance brand Boadicea the Victorious, set to launch at London Fashion Week next month.


Aimed at the über-rich and famous, the ‘three-tier’ range will feature visual brand language including an identity, graphics, illustration, artwork, packaging and structural forms designed by Boadi.


‘I wanted to find a way of connecting with the masses, giving them a little bit of history, celebrating Queen Boadicea. In naming the fragrances, I have given them the personality traits of human beings, such as majestic,’ says Boadi.


He reveals that all elements of the range – from the perfumer to the crystal and hallmark silver containers – are to be kept British, as a celebration of British craft.


‘Everyone goes to Lalique for fragrance ranges, no one celebrates British craft. All my fragrances are made with the help of an English perfumer –the English are always easier to deal with,’ Boadi says.


The range, which will be available online at www.boadiceathevictorious.co.uk from next month, will also include candles and hair perfume.


Digital studio Webglu is developing the site.


The range of 65 fragrances includes: a main collection; a ‘private collection’, from which customers can select perfumes and personalised packaging; and a bespoke, exclusive fragrance service, with bespoke packaging, costing up to £3000.


Funding for the range, on which Boadi has been working for five years, is coming from private backers, he says.


Boadicea the Victorious will launch on 17 September, during London Fashion Week.

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