Lines of Thought

A series of installations, photographs and other artworks that explore the use of line are going on show at east London’s Parasol Unit next week, exploring how the meaning and use of line varies from artist to artist and generation to generation.

Hemali Bhuta, Stepping Down

Source: Copyright the artist and Project 88

Hemali Bhuta, Stepping Down

We love the primeval-looking works of Hemali Bhuta, an Indian artist who creates site-specific installations such as Stepping Down – a dramatic piece that makes for a cave-like experience, using several thousand wax stalactites to simulate candles.

Hemali Bhuta, Stepping Down detail

Source: Copyright the artist and Project 88

Hemali Bhuta, Stepping Down detail

Fred Sandback’s work from the 1960s is distinctly minimalist in its aesthetic, looking at line in its most clinical form; while the enormous doodling of Turkish team,

Fred Sandback Untitled Nr 4 1968

Source: Private Collection Copyright © 2012 Fred Sandback Archive Photography Peter Hauck, Basel

Fred Sandback Untitled Nr 4 1968

Özlem Gunyol and Mustafa Kunt aim to provide a comment on geopolitical issues, with the lines representing the crossover of different nationalities and the idea of borders between countries.

Gunyol and Kunt, Ceaseless Doodle

Source: Photo: Cem Yücetas

Gunyol and Kunt, Ceaseless Doodle

American artist Adrian Esparza will be exhibiting a new work, which also draws its inspiration from the idea of national borders. For the piece, Esparza mounts a traditional Mexican blanket, or serape, onto the wall, which is then partially unwound. The cotton thread is then weaved through a grid of nails to form a geometric pattern, while also referencing the idea of history unravelling.

Anne Truitt, 13 Harvest Shade

Source: Image copyright © Estate of Anne Truitt and courtesy Estate of Anne Truitt, Stephen Friedman Gallery

Anne Truitt, 13 Harvest Shade

Lines of Thought runs from 29 February  – 1 May at the Parasol Unit, 14 Wharf Road, London N1

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