The Plant creates new identity for frozen yoghurt brand Frae

The Plant has rebranded frozen yoghurt brand Frae, with the new visual identity debuting with the opening of the brand’s London King’s Road store, which features interiors by MBA.

logo

The consultancy was appointed to the project in September last year on credentials.

It has created a new identity and logo to be shown across all collateral including menus, marketing materials, in-store graphics and signage. The new branding aims to reflect the natural qualities of the product. It is inspired by old dairy marketing, which is also reflected in the interiors, with the brand stamped onto zinc and stainless steel.

Matt Utber, founder of The Plant, says, ‘We did a big strategy piece which identified a couple of things in terms of how they could own the brand and the way it’s sold. We’ve changed the whole structure – they’ve become a bit more adventurous with taste to go into the “foodie” section, so we’ve restructured the whole menu.’

Frae

The Plant has built a new colour system around the existing brand colours  of predominantly blue and green.

Utber says, ‘It’s a very simple look and feel and we’ve redesigned the logo to give it a much stronger feeling of what makes it unique. The brand is very female-skewed so it has a natural and conversational feel.’

Frae postcard

The branding uses a typographic question and answer system to highlight the natural qualities and health claims of the yoghurt, using a series of stamps with a ‘vaguely vintage feel’, according to Utber.

The product has also been re-photographed in more natural settings, such as a kitchen, to add a sense of ‘intimacy’ and give a more contemporary feel.

Frae currently has four London outlets, with four more planned to open this year. The first will be the King’s Road branch, which opens in early March. The new website, which has also been created by The Plant, will also launch early next month.

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