Government launches plan for creative industries


The Government is launching its ‘first ever comprehensive action plan for the creative industries’ today, born out of its Creative Economy Programme.


The design industry is one of a dozen sectors that are key to the new 26-point plan from three Government departments, which is aiming to ‘help creative professionals and businesses thrive’.


Culture Secretary Andy Burnham says, ‘The creative industries must move from the margins to the mainstream of economic and policy thinking, as we look to create the jobs of the future.’


Among the proposals unveiled by Burnham were plans to create 5000 apprenticeships across the creative industries – including design – and to explore the creation of an academic hub for 14- to 25-year-olds, and a new World Creative Business Conference, as revealed by Design Week earlier this week. Other ‘commitments’ from the Government include the creation of ‘five new centres of excellence’ in creative skills, though design will not figure in this.


Schemes to leverage funding through public bodies like the Arts Council, the Technology Strategy Board and Nesta were also highlighted, as well as opportunities for fund managers to bid for Enterprise Capital Funds.


For a copy of the report, visit www.culture.gov.uk.


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  • RitaSue Siegel November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    5,000 apprenticeships sounds great. My only problem is that, as I heard from a consultant working in IBM’s consulting group who has been interviewed for a position by a design consulting firm, there are other creative people besides designers, musicians, and writers, etd. There are creative strategic consultants, marketers, financial specialists, researchers, physicians. Why is the word creatvies reserved for a limited group who as individuals may not be so creative? It is insulting, actually.

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