Landor’s Citroën logo launches

Citroën has launched its new corporate identity, designed by Landor Associates Paris.

Citroën has launched its new corporate identity, designed by Landor Associates Paris and Citroën’s in-house team led by Jean-Pierre Ploué


The French car manufacturer last night unveiled a softer and less angular incarnation of its chevron corporate identity in Paris, alongside the first in a series of three redesigned DS models.


The company is hoping the new identity, car models and showrooms will help lift it out of a downturn in the car industry, caused by a slump in sales and a continuing dearth of credit.


Design Week reported last year that Landor was appointed to undertake an estimated seven-figure review of the car manufacturer’s branding, amid a push to move the brand into the upper mid-size fleet market, traditionally dominated by German manufacturers such as Volkswagen and Audi.


The Peugeot-Citroën group posted an 8.7 per cent drop in sales of assembled vehicles in 2008. Citroën sales fell 7.5 per cent and Peugeot vehicle sales dropped 8.7 per cent, according to reports.


The original DS was designed by Citroën’s Flaminio Bertoni and launched at the 1955 Paris Motor Show.


Bertoni reinterpreted the original blue-and-yellow marque at the same time, creating a stark and simpler identity with the chevrons.

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  • chris November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    I am stunned at it’s mediocrity – and depressed that a firm who seemed to have got their car designs so right (with the exception of the C3) have swallowed such a bland response. The font is just rubbish and try hard. The rounding off (or the big idea…) makes it appear sloppy, blunt and lacking the direction and intent the old mark offered. Glad my car doesn’t have this melty tech pish on it.

  • jazz November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    I too am finding it slightly dissapointing that a company would shell out so much for something that doesn’t work that well. While I understand that the logo can’t be changed too much otherwise you may lose the identity altogether, I do think that such a mediocre change has cost a company in an apparently losing industry dearly. If the rebranding was a student university competition, they’d have a much more creative response for a fraction of the cost AND the company would have been seen to be putting something into the designers of tomorrow instead of these overpaid studios.

  • euge November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    Looks great. fresh modern but has the citroen character

  • Hahn November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    If the company really believes that this “new” logo is going to help pull them out of the decline in automobile sales, they had better be prepared for huge load of disappointment. I mean — did they really say that ???!??!?

  • L Francis November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    It succeeds only in highlighting Citroen’s loss of it’s original quirkyness, at least their early 2CV and the DS to name two, at least those cars you could love or hate.

    There is no longer a distiguished feel to French cars, why do we need more German-esque models when the BMW/Audi etc already dominate the field. What happened to niches and individuality?

    Now it’s a case of ‘modern and fresh’, yawn, more like ‘no character, no ideas’ – there’s a tagline to boot!

    Am i the only one who thinks the new model looks like an Action-man toy?

  • harkesh November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    The new concept citroen is nice but reminds me too much of the mini, althougth it might be slightly bigger it still has the similar features. Overall it is a nice design and shape to of the car.

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