Carbon Trust launches Water Standard logo

Coca-Cola and Sainsbury’s are among early adopters of the Carbon Trust’s new standard targeting companies wishing to address water waste.

The identity for the new standard designed by the Carbon Trust

A logo for the Carbon Trust Water Standard scheme has been designed in-house by the Carbon Trust’s marketing team and will be used by businesses as a badge honouring compliance for measuring, managing and reducing water use.

Peter Hambly, director of marketing and communications for the Carbon Trust says, ‘We expect our customers to use the logo widely and in a similar way to how customers currently use the Standard logo to promote their carbon reduction achievements.’

Businesses are expected to apply the symbol broadly rather then use it for particular products and services, or on packaging.

Hambly says, ‘The methodology for the water standard does not cover water use and inputs through the supply chain of a specific product or service, therefore there will be restrictions around using the Water Standard logo on packaging.

‘We are keen however to support our customers in using the logo widely to promote their achievement – where the guidelines allow, we will review customer needs on a case by case basis.’

The Carbon Trust, which says the water standard is the world’s first international award for water reduction, sees water as ‘the new frontier in the battle against climate change and the devastating impact of the depleting of resources’.

Freshwater need exceeding availability by 2030 and increased cost to businesses have been raised as reasons for compliance by the Carbon Trust.

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Comments
  • Brendan Martin November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    Looks rather like three logos cobbled together in search of an idea.

  • Donata Morkunaite November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    It is very clear what this logo is trying to say. very good work.

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