APFEL to create Hepworth Wakefield museum identity

Graphic design studio A Practice for Everyday Life has been appointed to design the visual identity for The Hepworth Wakefield, a new museum opening in 2010.

The new gallery will display a collection of Barbara Hepworth sculptures as well as other permanent and temporary exhibitions, including the work of British artists Henry Moore and Anthony Caro.

The Hepworth Wakefield will replace Wakefield’s current art gallery on the waterfront, and is being funded by the Arts Council and the Heritage Lottery Fund.

APFEL director Emma Thomas says, ‘We are going to be designing the visual identity for The Hepworth Wakefield, including all its printed material, website and signage.’

The consultancy will work under the guidance of Simon Wallis, the director of The Hepworth Wakefield.

The London-based studio will also be working closely with David Chipperfield Architects, which designed the gallery that is currently under construction.

APFEL has previous experience in the galleries and museums sector, and was recently commissioned by Tate Britain to design a new identity for the Turner Prize, and by the Victoria & Albert Museum to design a book for its Cold War Modern exhibition.

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  • Janie Lindsay November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    What a shame that a museum based in Wakefield, specifically because Barbara Hepworth was from Wakefield, didn’t appoint an agency from Yorkshire to take care of their identity and branding. While I don’t want to take anything away from APFEL’s achievement in winning this account, I’m sure a local agency could have been found with the talent and experience to take this on. Good design does not hail from London alone!

  • Nick Coombe November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    Does Janie Lindsay also think a Yorkshire based architect should have been appointed to design the museum, rather than David Chipperfield?

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