Word and Image

The familiar image of a camp, monochrome bodybuilder brandishing a lollipop marked ‘POP’ is one of the loudest, clearest signals of the start of the Pop Art movement in the 1950s.

Just what was it that made yesterday’s homes so different, so appealing? 1991

Source: © The Estate of Richard Hamilton, Courtesy Alan Cristea Gallery

Just what was it that made yesterday’s homes so different, so appealing? 1991

The iconic collage piece – entitled Just what is it that makes today’s homes so different, so appealing? – was created by Richard Hamilton, seen by many as the godfather of British pop art, back in 1956.

A portrait of the artist by Francis Bacon 1970-71

Source: © The Estate of Richard Hamilton, Courtesy Alan Cristea Gallery

A portrait of the artist by Francis Bacon1970-71

Indeed, it’s hard to overstate Hamilton’s importance to the movement, which he helped to define in a 1957 letter, saying,  ‘Pop Art is: popular, transient, expendable, low- cost, mass-produced, young, witty, sexy, gimmicky, glamorous, and Big Business.’

Adonis in Y fronts 1963 Screenprint from 12 stencils on cartridge paper  Paper 68.5 x 84.0 cm; Image 60.6 x 81.5 cm Printed at Kelpra Studio, London Edition 40 + printer’s proofs Published by the artist

Source: © The Estate of Richard Hamilton, Courtesy Alan Cristea Gallery

Adonis in Y fronts, 1963

The work was reworked into a print by Hamilton in 1991 (now titled Just what was it that made yesterday’s homes so different, so appealing) and is one of the artist’s many incredible print works set to go on show at London’s Alan Cristea gallery next month, accompanying a major retrospective at the Tate Modern of Hamilton’s work, as well as an additional exhibition at the ICA, also opening next month.

Bathers (b) 1969 Dye-transfer on dye-transfer paper mounted on board Paper 48.8 x 64.1 cm; Image 38.7 x 54.1 cm Printed at Creative Colour, Hamburg 9 trial proofs were made prior to making the final matrices Edition 75 + 7 artist’s proofs Published by Pet

Source: © The Estate of Richard Hamilton, Courtesy Alan Cristea Gallery

Bathers (b)1969

The Alan Cristea show is entitled Word and Image, Prints 1963-2007, and will present a large range of the London-born artist’s prints over the five decades, with recurring themes of ‘protest, portraits, interiors and landscapes’, says the gallery.

Release 1972

Source: © The Estate of Richard Hamilton, Courtesy Alan Cristea Gallery

Release 1972

Another of Hamilton’s most famous works is the Swingeing London ’67 series of prints and paintings, which examine the police raid on Keith Richards’ Redlands home in Sussex February 1967, which led to the arrest of Richards and Hamilton’s friend and art dealer Robert Fraser.

Swingeing London 67 – etching 1968

Source: © The Estate of Richard Hamilton, Courtesy Alan Cristea Gallery

Swingeing London 67 – etching 1968

More of the many famous faces to be depicted in Hamilton’s prints include the Beatles, for whom he designed the cover for the White Album.

Beatles, 2007 Inkjet digital print on Somerset Enhanced Radiant White Velvet paper Paper 105.0 x 76.0 cm; Image 86.5 x 57.0 cm Image created on a Macintosh G5 using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop Printed on an Epson Stylus Pro 9800 printer using Epson Ul

Source: © The Estate of Richard Hamilton, Courtesy Alan Cristea Gallery

Beatles, 2007

Richard Hamilton Word and Image, Prints 1963-2007,  will be at the Alan Cristea Gallery, 31 and 34 Cork Street, London W1S from 14 February – 22 March 2014 www.alancristea.com

TiT 2002

Source: © The Estate of Richard Hamilton, Courtesy Alan Cristea Gallery

TiT 2002

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