What’s the strangest and most inventive designer CV you’ve been sent?

Designers talk about CVs disguised as milk cartons, action figures, back-scratchers, coffee cups, and Kinder Eggs.

GH

‘One of the ones that sticks in my mind was a pint of fresh milk with a CV printed on, hand-delivered by a student who is from Guernsey. Another one that hung around the studio was from a Kingston graduate who sent a beautiful wooden back scratcher. The other one that we have seen was not sent to us but to Sagmeister & Walsh – it was a “try before you hire” action figure.’

Gareth Howat, creative director, Hat-Trick Design

MA

‘We didn’t have any vacancies and this girl called Kerry had graduated but had decided she wanted to work with us. She was filling in time working at Starbucks and she sent us some coffee every week for a month. Then she sent her CV, which was a copy of the Starbucks wrap that goes around the coffee, and she replaced all the details with her details. It was simple and very effective. Totally original. She got the job, and she was fantastic.’

Marksteen Adamson, partner, ASHA

BS

‘Over the years we’ve received some fairly “creative” interpretations of designer’s CVs. One of the most inventive (and smallest) however, was from a young design graduate last Easter. His CV came packaged within a Kinder Egg and a hand-etched box. You had to break the egg to get to a tiny portfolio of his work. A really fantastic idea and we still have the packaging in the studio.’

Ben Steers, co-founder and creative director, Fiasco Design

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Thanks to Greg Quinton for the original inspiration for this voxpop.

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  • Jono lumo November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    All sounds pretty cheesy to me. Copying and using whats already exists is inferior and by no means original. Replacing info on a package that already exists is not either. Sorry don’t agree

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