Alexander Boxill creates 10 Social Housing Projects exhibition identity

Consultancy Alexander Boxill has designed  the identity for the 10 Social Housing Projects exhibition in London, creating graphics based on the wooden palettes that display the work.

Show invite
Show invite

The show, which is part of London’s Festival of Architecture, takes place in a disused building Hackney Wick, east London, and displays 10 projects by Clerkenwell-based practice Karakusevic Carson Architects. These are mostly in east and north London, and are all for local authority clients and community housing associations.

Colour-coded graphic panels
Colour-coded graphic panels

Alexander Boxill shares a studio with Karakusevic Carson, and began work on the graphics around a month ago.

10 Social Housing Projects uses wooden palettes to showcase the projects, showing a total of almost 3000 new homes, as well as displaying historical context on post-war housing and commentary from residents that have lived on the estates for around four or five decades.

The projects are displayed on wooden palettes
The projects are displayed on wooden palettes

Violetta Boxill, Alexander Boxill founder, says, ‘The palettes dictated a lot [of the graphics] – that was the starting point. Working to a grid on a palette was quite useful in many ways’.

The exhibits are numbered using typography that reflects the palette idea, using numbers in the Gaijin typeface, which has a three-dimensional appearance and was chosen for its ‘slightly architectural’ feel. The other text uses the sans serif typeface Brown.

Boxill says, ‘Because it was in a disused space we could paint on the floor. It shows ten projects but some fall within one estate, so we used colour to denote those and make it easier to understand.

‘Because of the time-frame we were working in some of the graphics were printed in house, so we nailed them to the MDF information boards. It’s all very pared-back’.

10 Social Housing Projects exhibition
10 Social Housing Projects exhibition

The information boards for the exhibits are colour coded using a range of bright tones, chosen, says Boxill, because they were ‘colours I like’.

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  • Matt - November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    Not sure about the type butting up to the edges but love the idea & typeforms!

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