Very Studio creates motorcycle safety website

Very Studio has won a £10 000 brief to revamp the Department for Transport’s Think Motorcycle Academy website.



Very Studio has won a £10 000 brief to revamp the Department for Transport’s Think Motorcycle Academy website.


The London consultancy, which won the project following an official public tender against at least five consultancies earlier this month, has already started work on the brief with a view to completion by the beginning of April.


‘Having worked on [helmet safety scheme] Sharp and for Yamaha, we’ve got a good knowledge of the sector and of DfT policies on safety, which I think helped us win the contract. Our compliancy knowledge in producing websites for Government helped as well,’ says Very Studio director Alex Smith.


The ‘general requirement’ of the Web overhaul is to update the Think Motorcycle Academy site to provide ‘easily accessible, understandable, clear information’ relating to motorcycle safety as well as engaging a wider audience outside of the ‘super bike’-riders group.


‘The majority of accidents happen with super bikes on the road, so the idea is to promote motorcycle safety, targeting this rider while opening up to a broader audience that includes the urban leisure rider,’ says Smith.


Very is working to produce a new look and style for the website, including photography style and page templates, as well as devising ‘more interesting’ content.


‘Part of the brief is to come up with ways of getting more interesting user-generated content on to the site. We’re considering ways users can send in pictures when they’re at [motorbike] race meetings; or having a bike guru who people can text for advice and information. Other things we’re looking at are ‘top five’ suggestions, which could be a five-star-rated helmet or the top five bike routes within the UK and Europe,’ says Smith.


The revamped site, www.dft.gov.uk/thinkmotorcycleacademy, is set to go live on 5 April.


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