Illustrate your own trainers

Illustrators, designers, and artists are being encouraged to submit their designs to Sneakerly – a trainer website with a unique creative symbiosis which seems to be helping everyone involved.

Vegetables abound
Vegetables abound

You, the designer, submits a design to Sneakerly.com, which if backed by 250 pre-orders, is made into a batch of trainers.

The designer then gets around £1550 if Sneakerly hits the target, and customers’ accounts are only debited if the 250 order target is met.

Werewolf
Werewolf

‘Some call it crowd-sourcing but we call it common sense, because we only make what you want us to make,’ says straight talking Sneakerly founder David Hill who adds, ‘If you really like them, prove it.’

Bulk orders mean an additional 1000 shoes of any one successful design are stock-piled for further ordering and to sell to stockists.

Ross Moody's design
Ross Moody’s design

Those who buy a pair of the first 250, rather then the other 1000, receive a shoe lace badge which they can flagrantly attach to their wears indicating that they made it happen, plus their name will be printed on to the box, along with those of 249 other folk.

Ross Moody is on the way to a commission
Ross Moody is on the way to a commission

In another design-led move the shoe-box is wrapped in a cardboard sleeve which folds out as a poster to show the design of the shoe.

DKNG Studios
DKNG Studios

Sneakerly.com holds the apparel patent but the designers can use their design in any other way they chose.

Kapow design
Kapow design

 ‘The designer can focus on their art and doesn’t have to worry about manufacturing or order fulfillment, Sneakerly takes care of all that,’ says Hill, who is encouraging submissions from interested designers and illustrators to come up with repeat patterns. 

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Comments
  • Yaiza Gardner November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    You have to sell 250 pairs in 25 days in order to get paid which is ten a day!- this is a lot of sales in a short space of time and they own the rights obviously.

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