Bold lines, bright colours (just don’t call it Pop Art)

Running concurrently with Tate Britain’s Patrick Caulfield survey opening next week, London’s Alan Cristea Gallery is showing a number of the artist’s distinctive prints.

Three Sausages, 1978
Three Sausages, 1978

Even the most cursory of glances over Caulfield’s work shows just how far his iconic style has permeated contemporary graphic design and illustration.

Lung Ch'uan Ware and Window, 1990

Source: Courtesy the artist and the Alan Cristea Gallery

Lung Ch’uan Ware and Window, 1990

The bold colours, thick black lines and the transformation of the most quotidian items into vibrant icons are undoubtedly part of the fabric of today’s visual culture.

For John Constable

Source: Courtesy the artist and the Alan Cristea Gallery

For John Constable

Whether knowingly or not, Caulfield’s influence can be seen in the likes of the work of artist Julian Opie and band Hot Chip’s artwork.

Ruins

Source: Courtesy the artist and the Alan Cristea Gallery

Ruins

The Alan Cristea exhibition spans Caulfield’s career from his first print, 1964’s Ruins, which was commissioned by London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts as part of a 14-print series of works now seen as instrumental in proving the power of screenprinting as a medium. Other artists included in the series were Eduardo Paolozzi, Richard Hamilton and David Hockney.

Grey Pipe, 1981

Source: Courtesy the artist and the Alan Cristea Gallery

Grey Pipe, 1981

While Caulfield is frequently associated with the pop art movement, Caulfield rejected the label, instead focussing on his work’s roots in European influences such as Cezanne and Cubist artists such as Gris, Braque and Picasso.

His final print Demoiselles d’Avignon vues de Derriere, created in 1999, is the artist’s homage to Picasso – albeit a rather cheeky one.

Les Demoiselles d'Avignon vue de Derriere, 1999

Source: Courtesy the artist and the Alan Cristea Gallery

Les Demoiselles d’Avignon vue de Derriere, 1999

Patrick Caulfield Prints runs from 5 June – 13 July Alan Cristea Gallery: 31&34 Cork Street, London W1

Picnic Set.

Source: Courtesy the artist and the Alan Cristea Gallery

Picnic Set.

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