Wayfinding scheme launched in London

Applied Information Group’s ambitious wayfinding system for pedestrians launches in central London today, backed by Transport for London,

Applied Information Group’s ambitious wayfinding system for pedestrians launches in central London today, backed by Transport for London.



The Legible London wayfinding prototype is to be trialled on London’s Bond Street and the surrounding area over the next 12 weeks.



‘Oxford Street is unequivocally the nation’s high street, but there’s an eclectic mix of restaurants, shops and entertainment – from Carnaby Street cool to Savile Row style – just a short stroll away,’ says the leader of Westminster City Council, Sir Simon Milton.



‘This prototype is just the beginning, and we’re looking forward to its rollout across the rest of the West End and Westminster.’



AIG has removed more than 40 existing street signs, replacing them with 19 ‘monolith and minilith’ display maps and information. The signs will ‘talk’ to pedestrians who call the phone number printed on the signs.



Local bus shelters and Bond Street Tube station are also displaying Legible London maps, which feature famous retail stores like Selfridges to help pedestrians navigate the area.



TfL hopes to extend the scheme to central and east London boroughs before the Olympic Games in 2012 and to all urban centres in Greater London by 2015.



A free public exhibition on the new wayfinding system is being held at 10 Heddon Street, from 28 November to 1 December. Visitors are being asked to share their views as part of a public consultation running until February 2008.

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