Information is Beautiful 2013 winners

Nobels, No Degrees, by Accurat
Nobels, No Degrees, by Accurat

The winners of the Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards have been announced across five categories celebrating excellence and beauty in data visualisation, infographics and data journalism.

Data visualisation studio Information is Beautiful set up the competition last year with research and insight agency Kantar. This year entrants have been vying for a shared prize of more than £15,000.

Accurat wins the Data Visualisation category for Nobels, No Degrees, which is a graphic exploration of the links between Nobel prize winners and their qualifications.

Global Warming by Derek Kim
Global Warming by Derek Kim

The Infographic award has gone to Derek Kim for Global Warming.  

Bloomberg Billionaires Index by Bloomberg Visual Data
Bloomberg Billionaires Index by Bloomberg Visual Data

Bloomberg Billionaires Index, by Bloomberg Visual Data takes gold in the Interactive Visualisation category for its display of the changing fortunes and profiles of the world’s billionaires.

The Solar System: Our Home in Space, Philipp Dettmer, Stephan Rether, Cathrin Ziegler
The Solar System: Our Home in Space, Philipp Dettmer, Stephan Rether, Cathrin Ziegler

The Solar System: Our Home in Space by Phillip Dettmer, Stephan Rether, Cathrin Ziegler, and Thomas Veith won the Motion Graphic category.

Infogram by Uldis Leiterts, Raimonds Kaze, Alise Semjonova
Infogram by Uldis Leiterts, Raimonds Kaze, Alise Semjonova

The Tool or Website category was taken by Uldis Leiterts, Raimonds Kaze, Alise Semjanova for their work on Infogram.

David Mcandless, founder of Information is Beautiful – and author of the book of the same name – says, ‘It’s hell on Earth to judge a competition like this, the quality and inventiveness of the work is so high.

‘Data visualisation is really a new, emerging design form and a rising trend across many disciplines: news, web, science, marketing, even politics. The sheer range of approaches, content and style in this work has to be seen to be believed.’

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