Photography & Image

Digital technology has turned photography on its head. With just about every mobile device containing a camera of some quality, ordinary folk now have image-making at their fingertips and the results abound on social media sites across the globe.

Many photographers have cashed in on this, bringing their own eye to photographic art. But as with other craft areas of design, there is a growing backlash against technology, with a new appetite for traditional approaches creeping in.

Richard Learoyd is an extreme example. He has crossed over from commercial photography to art and embraced camera obscura, building his own pinhole camera to pursue his goal. But he is not alone. Students are also dabbling with the older crafts, and we can expect some interesting outcomes from their experimentation.

However, there is no denying that the onset of ’rich media’ online will prompt further exploration of its potential by stills photographers.

One thing is sure, though – despite the democratisation of photography in the digital age, professional involvement is secure. New technologies just add to the diversity of imagery photographers can hope to achieve.

Lynda Relph-Knight
Editor, Design Week

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  • peter ashworth November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    “One thing is sure, though – despite the democratisation of photography in the digital age, professional involvement is secure”
    WRONG!!! not in every arena of photography – record sleeves for example – where the client wants to save money, the use of non-pros is commonplace

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