3D and the art of Massive Attack

The Vinyl Factory is publishing a visual history of Massive Attack by Robert del Naja – more commonly known as 3D, once a prolific graffiti artist and more famously a founding member of the band.

3D
3D

Massive Attack have sold 11 million records since their first album Blue Lines was released in 1991.

All the while 3D has been making and collecting images, which he has now compiled and designed using pieces saved from a personal archive.

As 3D made the transition from graffiti artist with his Wild Bunch graffiti crew to Massive Attack member he turned his hand to record art for the band, while continuing to produce other paste-ups and paintings.

It’s all here in the book alongside his many collaborations with the likes of Nick Knight, Tom Hingston, Judy Blame and Michael Nash Associates.

Massive Attack

There are unseen photographs documenting 3D’s ongoing collaboration with United Visual Artists, and examples of his recent work with filmmaker Adam Curtis.

The 400-page book features an in-depth interview with the artist, where he describes the development of the band’s artwork and record sleeve designs, as well as offering insights into his processes, and inspirations.

These are disparate and many, ranging from magazine culture and comics, including New York’s hip-hop scene and Japanese graphics, and Jean-Michel Basquiat’s cultural juxtapositions, to Warhol’s pop imagery, politics and punk.

To celebrate the release of the book, The Vinyl Factory will also release an additional, limited edition screen-printed box set with an exclusive print by Del Naja.

Massive Attack

The hardback book features alternative cover artwork, and a vinyl 12-inch of a previously unreleased track with an etched B-side. The signed collector’s edition will be limited to 350 copies, priced at £350 each.

The Vinyl Factory will publish 3D and the art of Massive Attack on 28 October 2013; the hardback book will be priced at £50.

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