Nescafé RSVP coffee table book Harrison Pursey corporate brochure

At London design consultancy Blast, uncoated paper usually gets first shout, but it is often specifically recommended when a project requires less formality.

Consultancy: Blast

Client: Nestlé/ Harrison Pursey

Designers: Harrison Pursey – Martin Cox

Nestl̩ РGiff, Matt Baxter

At London design consultancy Blast, uncoated paper usually gets first shout, but it is often specifically recommended when a project requires less formality. In its recent work with recruitment consultant Harrison Pursey, Blast felt uncoated paper would lend the company’s latest brochure a more ‘human’ feel – vital as its business centres around people. ‘As the paper’s physical coating is not there,’ says Blast partner Martin Cox, ‘uncoated stock almost feels more honest.’

Blast redesigned Harrison Pursey’s complete corporate identity to retain a professional image but become more approachable. To reflect this repositioning in the brochure, it used smart metallic ink, but uncoated paper to keep it less austere and more tactile. The stock also softened the images, something that wouldn’t have been achieved on coated paper.

Blast used similar thinking for a Nescafé book entitled RSVP. The book encourages readers to invite friends round for a cappuccino or dinner instead of visiting bars and cafés. It features aspirational lifestyle photography in muted, coffee-coloured hues and tips from celebrities on how to throw a great dinner party. Blast felt uncoated paper better reflected the subject matter, but it was a struggle to talk Nestlé away from coated paper. ‘At first, the client wanted glossy paper to achieve a ‘high-quality’ look and because it thought uncoated paper was cheaper. But coated stock would have detracted from the book’s laid-back lifestyle message,’ says Cox.

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