Dalziel & Pow look for discount chain

Discount retailer Poundstretcher is to lose its name and visual identity in a far-reaching rebrand by Dalziel & Pow, which will be unveiled at a trial store next month.

Discount retailer Poundstretcher is to lose its name and visual identity in a far-reaching rebrand by Dalziel & Pow, which will be unveiled at a trial store next month.

It follows a full-scale restructuring of Poundstretcher owner Brown & Jackson’s business last August, which included selling off all store chains except Poundstretcher in a bid to turn the business around into profitability. Like-for-like sales rose 13 per cent in the seven weeks to 15 February.

Dalziel & Pow has created a name, visual identity and interiors concept for the retailer. Details are currently under wraps until the trial outlet opens in the north-west of England in mid-April.

‘It is a major initiative for us and a large change from the existing branding,’ says Poundstretcher marketing director Mike Morrison. ‘We’re still in the process of finalising details on the [rebranding] project,’ he adds.

Dalziel & Pow’s work includes interiors layout, fixtures, point-ofsale, graphics and a name.

It was appointed ‘about a month ago’, says creative director David Dalziel. ‘This isn’t Poundstretcher in a new typeface, it’s a major overhaul of the brand. It’s not Poundstretcher as we know it,’ he adds.

The format, if successful, will roll out across 20 stores in the north-east by September, says Morrison, who is leading the work along with Poundstretcher store development director Pat Quiney.

A wider roll out is planned for 2004, across new and existing stores nationwide.

The work follows research earlier this year on both the Poundstretcher name and identity and on the new branding, says Morrison.

The project follows the appointment of former Matalan chief Angus Monro as chief executive last year.

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