Brentford FC gets new “simpler, bolder” bee crest

The redesign by London-based studio, Article, is inspired by the club’s previous roundel crest from the 1970s.

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Article has redesigned Brentford Football Club’s crest, ahead of its expected move to a new stadium in Kew Bridge, west London in 2018.

The new design is “simpler, bolder and more recognisable” than the previous crest, while remaining true to The Bees’ heritage, says Article co-founder, Joe Ryrie.

The studio was briefed by the club to design a crest which would work effectively across a range of digital and physical applications – including app icons and the entrance of the new stadium – in full colour, single colour and a standalone graphic element.

18-month project

The final design is the result of an 18-month process which involved consulting fans, staff, directors and the club owner.

“I don’t think I’ve ever worked on something that will be scrutinised as closely by people who care so much,” says Ryrie. “Brentford’s fans play an influential role in the club…so making sure we were being sensitive to the history and traditions of the club has probably been the defining feature of the project.”

“Whatever we did we knew some fans weren’t going to like it, but…we’ve done our very best to create something that represents the club’s identity with much more impact and that all fans will grow to love.”

Illustration by Peter Horridge

Article looked at evolutions of all of Brentford’s historical crests, narrowed them down during the consultation process then commissioned specialist illustrator, Peter Horridge, to draw the final bee.

The new crest references the supporters’ club badge from the 1960s, as well as the roundel crest used from 1972-1975. The bee illustration has angular edges to give it a more “competitive” feel than previous iterations of the logo.

The yellow colour of the bee is a nod to the gold racing colour used by the club’s former patron, Lord Rothschild, when it turned professional in 1903.

“Modern but classic”

Article opted to use Buenos Aires bold for the typeface, which it says is “modern but classic” and legible when used in smaller sizes. Subtle stripes can also be seen in the background of the crest, in reference to the red and white stripes on the team’s home shirts.

“All the work we’ve done with Brentford FC is part of a plan to make sure their brand is Premier League-ready by the time they move into their new stadium in a couple of years,” says Ryrie.

“Being brave enough and open enough to change their crest to something far more iconic and impactful is one of many signals that Brentford is a forward-thinking, progressive club – off the field as well as on it.”

The new club crest will be rolled out from the start of the 2017/18 season.

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Comments
  • Mark Roberts November 15, 2016 at 3:24 pm

    There’s an odd perspective/illusion on the wings that makes it look loike the bbe’s body is passing over an avenue of skyscrapers.

  • Martin April 26, 2017 at 10:48 am

    The old adage “You can’t polish a turd” has just been disproved. Besides Chelsea you don’t get much more turd-like.

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