Lumsden designs new comic book store

Lumsden Design has designed a retail concept for comic shop Gosh which moves to a new premises in London’s Soho.


The consultancy was approached on the strength of book shop credentials and began creative discussions with the client in May.

Opening on 6 August,  ‘A raw lived-in New York loft feel’ will pervade the two floor Berwick Street space, says consultancy creative director Callum Lumsden.

Steel, iroko timber and reclaimed light fittings have been integrated across the ground floor. 

‘There’s a massive amount of product so they need a merchandise system that is flexible,’ says Lumsden.

It will also have to accommodate creator talks, art exhibitions, book signings and events.

One book display fitting can be repurposed to make a book signing table, there will be a rotation of original artworks and a back wall will be commissioned for street art – ‘which is a big part of the comic book sector now,’ says Lumsden.

‘Comics were one of the key inspirations in my decision to pursue a career in design,’ he adds. 

Hide Comments (3)Show Comments (3)
  • comiclover November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    boring as hell. Taken everything great about comic shops and thrown it in the bin. Looks like any other shop on the highstreet. Absolutely terrible.

    Now, Orbital comics… there’s a good design.

  • Reviewer November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    Yawn… did this project get any column inches on DW? It looks like a drab sushi restaurant. Lumsden should stick to what he does best/worst; dull retail outlets. What a waste of an exciting brief.

  • BW November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    Congratulations on a fantastically bland proposal. Very poor design…

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