Happy Families

If you are missing Blue Peter, you are almost certainly showing your age. And chances are you find yourself sneaking off of an evening for a local ‘making’ class in the hope of finding new ways to express yourself creatively with an old cereal box and toilet roll inner.

Richard Hogg created the poster graphics for the event
Richard Hogg created the poster graphics for the event

Sound familiar? Well, the opportunities for you to scratch that creative itch are likely to be there in spades this summer as various cultural institutions try to tempt in punters with kids to engage in hands-on programmes.

Among the more pertinent for the creative crew is likely to be the Design Museum’s Family Day, which offers all manner of fun pursuits in which you can share with your loved ones. A cut above the average Blue Peter show, it offers celebrity in the form of designer Donna Wilson, who will introduce visitors of all ages to her ‘menagerie of strange and beautiful creatures’ and you can even have a go at creating your own.

Donna Wilson's Blue Owl Cushion
Donna Wilson’s Blue Owl Cushion

For those with a graphics bent, you can take on graphics master Wim Crouwel – or at least, in his absence, take inspiration from his typefaces – in the Loopy Letters workshop. But for Blue Peter purists it has to be the Mechanical Toys session, where you are encouraged make your own automata from every day objects. Toilet rolls anyone?

Wim Crouwel's typography, 1968
Wim Crouwel’s typography, 1968

Wim Crouwel's 1957 Leger Van Abbemuseum Poster
Wim Crouwel’s 1957 Leger Van Abbemuseum Poster

These are among the attractions to keep you amused at the museum on Sunday 26 June. All you need is an assortment of five-to-11-year-olds to make the day complete.

Donna Wilson's Wolfie
Donna Wilson’s Wolfie

Family Day is at the Design Museum, Shad Thames, London SE1 on Friday 26 June.

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