Harrison & Co brands writers charity English Pen

Harrison & Co has rebranded writers charity English Pen with a new identity that aims to communicate writing under duress but also a sense of independence and freedom.

English pen

English Pen works largely with imprisoned writers, journalists and poets across the world who have been persecuted for beliefs or freedom of speech.

In this context Harrison sought to create a brand which would ‘reflect a feeling of “writing under duress” as well as communicating independence and freedom. The final solution is a hand drawn logo,’ says Harrison.

The Brighton based consultancy won the appointment through a paid three-way credentials pitch in August. Consultancy founder Chris Harrison says he was introduced to the charity having worked with its partner organisation Prisoners of Conscience for several years.  

English pen

Harrison says ‘Initially we worked with English Pen on a discovery workshop, designed to help us understand their brand and to help English PEN to focus on their key message and audience segmentation.’

Working closely with the charity, routes were developed which communicated ‘urgency, freedom and humanity,’ according to Harrison.

Considering the charity’s broad audience which includes politicians, journalists, writers and students, Harrison says the tonality of the brand needs to avoid ‘officialdom’ and instead reflect the values of freedom of speech.

A full roll out will begin in January and a Harrison designed website is to be developed before the consultancy begins on an annual review and magazine for the charity.  

Hide Comments (1)Show Comments (1)
Comments
  • Roger Fuller November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    If ever I saw a visual solution which answered the brief so well, this is it. Lovely piece of work – and what an improvement on the previous!

  • Post a comment

Latest articles

Remembering Jon Daniel: 1966-2017

We look back on the life and work of the Design Week columnist, independent creative director and social activist “who helped put black participation on the political map”.