Flying Scotsman is back on track with restored livery

The restoration saw 20 litres of undercoat, 30 litres of gloss and 20 litres of varnish used on the engine.

Mike O'Connor applies-Flying Scotsman's iconic number, watched by his daughter Teriann (Credit: Paul Kingston)
Mike O’Connor applies Flying Scotsman’s iconic number, watched by his daughter Teriann (Credit: Paul Kingston)

Iconic steam engine the Flying Scotsman has returned to the tracks following a £4.2 million restoration that has seen it repainted in its original British Rail green livery.

The locomotive, which made its first journey in 1923, has been restored in a project led by the National Railway Museum. After journeying up the East Coast Main Line from London, it will go on display in the York museum.

The NRM bought the Flying Scotsman for £2.3 million in 2004 and has restored it with funding from the National Heritage Memorial Fund, the Heritage Lottery Fund and public donations.

The engine had previously been in private hands and was bought by the museum with the aim of turning into a “working exhibit”.

As part of the restoration, the Flying Scotsman has been repainted in its original BR green livery, which replaces its former black livery.

The restoration was carried out by Heritage Painting and saw 20 litres of undercoat, 30 litres of gloss and 20 litres of varnish used on the engine.

Ian Hewitt of Heritage Painting says: “BR green will be recognised by many who saw the engine under public ownership in the late 50s and early 60s and it will be accompanied by orange and black lining and the BR crest.”

The Flying Scotsman will be in display at the NRM in York until 6 March, while a series of exhibitions will tell the story of the locomotive.

Heritage painter Ian Hewitt applies Scotsman's green livery (Credit: Paul Kingston)
Heritage painter Ian Hewitt applies Scotsman’s green livery (Credit: Paul Kingston)

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